Spring Boot and Content Negotiation - XML and JSON Representations


This guide will help you implement Content Negotiation for a REST API/Service with Spring Boot. Content Negotiation helps the Consumer and Provider interact about the data exchange format. In this article, we will expose both XML and JSON representations.

You will learn

  • What is Content Negotiation?
  • Why do you need Content Negotiation?
  • How do you implement Content Negotiation with Spring Boot?
  • How do you use XML representation for request and response with Spring Boot RESTful Services?
  • How do you use JSON representation for request and response with Spring Boot RESTful Services?

10 Step Reference Courses

Project Code Structure

Following screenshot shows the structure of the project we will create. Image

A few details:

  • SpringBoot2RestServiceApplication.java - The Spring Boot Application class generated with Spring Initializer. This class acts as the launching point for application.
  • pom.xml - Contains all the dependencies needed to build this project. We will use Spring Boot Starter AOP.
  • Student.java - Student JPA Entity
  • StudentRepository.java - Student JPA Repository. This is created using Spring Data JpaRepository.
  • StudentResource.java - Spring Rest Controller exposing all services on the student resource.
  • data.sql - Initial data for the student table. Spring Boot would execute this script after the tables are created from the entities.

Tools you will need

  • Maven 3.0+ is your build tool
  • Your favorite IDE. We use Eclipse.
  • JDK 1.8+

Complete Maven Project With Code Examples

Our Github repository has all the code examples - https://github.com/in28minutes/spring-boot-examples/tree/master/spring-boot-2-rest-service-content-negotiation

What is Content Negotiation?

REST stands for REpresentational State Transfer.

Key abstraction in REST is a Resource. There is no restriction on what can be a resource. A todo is a resource. A person on facebook is a resource.

A resource can have multiple representations

  • XML
  • HTML
  • JSON

When a resource is requested, we provide the representation of the resource.

When a consumer sends a request, it can specify two HTTP Headers related to Content Negotiation

  • Accept and
  • Content-Type

Content-Type indicates the content type of the body of the request.

Accept indicates the expected content type of the response.

Example of Content Negotiation

Following screenshot shows how you can specify these headers in a request using Postman. Image

The server is expected to respond based on the Accept header.

For example, if a consumer sends a request to http://localhost:8080/students/10001 with Accept header as ‘application/xml’, we need to provide the xml representation of the resource.

<Student>
    <id>10001</id>
    <name>Ranga</name>
    <passportNumber>E1234567</passportNumber>
</Student>

If a consumer sends a request with Accept header as ‘application/json’, we need to provide the JSON representation of the resource.

{
  "id": 10001,
  "name": "Ranga",
  "passportNumber": "E1234567"
}

Similar concept applies to the Response Body Content based on the Content-Type.

A consumer can send a POST request to http://localhost:8080/students with Content-Type header as ‘application/xml’, and provide the XML representation of the resource to be created.

<Student>
    <name>Ranga</name>
    <passportNumber>E1234567</passportNumber>
</Student>

A consumer can also send a POST request to http://localhost:8080/students with Content-Type header as ‘application/json’, and provide the JSON representation of the resource to be created.

{
  "name": "Ranga",
  "passportNumber": "E1234567"
}

This dialogue which happens between the Consumer and Service Provider is called Content Negotiation.

Bootstrapping a Project with a REST Resource

In the previous article in the series - http://www.springboottutorial.com/spring-boot-crud-rest-service-with-jpa-hibernate, we set up a simple restful service with a resource exposing CRUD methods.

We will use the same example to discuss about Content Negotiation.

Implementing Content Negotiation with Spring Boot

Let’s execute a few requests to discover that content negotiation is not provided by default by the project we created with Spring Boot Starter Web and move on the adding content negotiation to our application.

Executing a request with Accept Header ‘application/xml’

Send a request to http://localhost:8080/students/10001 with Accept header as ‘application/xml’.

You are expecting to get an XML representation of the resource.

However you would get a response with status -> 406 Not Acceptable. This indicates that application does not support providing a response with content type ‘application/xml’.

However if you send a request to http://localhost:8080/students/10001 with Accept header as ‘application/json’, you would get the response back as expected.

{
  "id": 10001,
  "name": "Ranga",
  "passportNumber": "E1234567"
}

Implementing XML Representation for Spring Boot Services

Its simple. All that you would need to do is to add a simple dependency to your pom.xml.

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.dataformat</groupId>
  <artifactId>jackson-dataformat-xml</artifactId>
</dependency>

Restart your application.

Send a request to http://localhost:8080/students/10001 with Accept header as ‘application/xml’.

Response

<Student>
    <id>10001</id>
    <name>Ranga</name>
    <passportNumber>E1234567</passportNumber>
</Student>

Cool! Your application now supports both XML and JSON representations of the student resource.

You can use

  • Content-Type to indicate content type of the body for POST and PUT requests.
  • Accept indicates the expected content type of the response for GET requests.

Playing with Content Negotiation

GET Request

  • URL - http://localhost:8080/students
  • Request Method - GET
  • Request Headers
    • Accept - application/xml

Response

<List>
    <item>
        <id>10001</id>
        <name>Ranga</name>
        <passportNumber>E1234567</passportNumber>
    </item>
    <item>
        <id>10002</id>
        <name>Ravi</name>
        <passportNumber>A1234568</passportNumber>
    </item>
</List>

POST Request

  • URL - http://localhost:8080/students
  • Request Method - POST
  • Request Headers
    • Content-Type - application/xml

Request

    <item>
        <name>Tom</name>
        <passportNumber>Z1234567</passportNumber>
    </item>

Response

  • Status 201 - CREATED
  • Header Location →http://localhost:8080/students/2

PUT Request

  • URL → http://localhost:8080/students/10002
  • Request
    • Method → PUT
  • Request Headers
    • Content-Type - application/xml

Request

<item>
    <name>Tom</name>
    <passportNumber>Z1234567</passportNumber>
</item>

Response with status 204 - No Content

Congratulations! You are reading an article from a series of 50+ articles on Spring, Spring Boot , Hibernate, Full Stack, Cloud and Microservices. We also have 20+ projects on our Github repository. For the complete series of 50+ articles and code examples, click here.

Join 300,000 Learners!

Learn Spring Boot in 10 Steps - FREE Course

Next Steps

[![Image]> Congratulations! You are reading an article from a series of 50+ articles on Spring, Spring Boot , Hibernate, Full Stack, Cloud and Microservices. We also have 20+ projects on our Github repository. For the complete series of 50+ articles and code examples, click here.

Join 300,000 Learners!

Learn Spring Boot in 10 Steps - FREE Course

Next Steps

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Complete Code Example

/pom.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
  <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

  <groupId>com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-boot-2-rest-service-content-negotiation</artifactId>
  <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
  <packaging>jar</packaging>

  <name>spring-boot-2-rest-service</name>
  <description>Spring Boot 2 and REST - Example Project</description>

  <parent>
    <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
    <version>2.0.0.RELEASE</version>
    <relativePath /> <!-- lookup parent from repository -->
  </parent>

  <properties>
    <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
    <project.reporting.outputEncoding>UTF-8</project.reporting.outputEncoding>
    <java.version>1.8</java.version>
  </properties>

  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-actuator</artifactId>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-web</artifactId>
    </dependency>


    <dependency>
      <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.dataformat</groupId>
      <artifactId>jackson-dataformat-xml</artifactId>
    </dependency>

    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-devtools</artifactId>
      <scope>runtime</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>com.h2database</groupId>
      <artifactId>h2</artifactId>
      <scope>runtime</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-test</artifactId>
      <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>

  <build>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>

  <repositories>
    <repository>
      <id>spring-snapshots</id>
      <name>Spring Snapshots</name>
      <url>https://repo.spring.io/snapshot</url>
      <snapshots>
        <enabled>true</enabled>
      </snapshots>
    </repository>
    <repository>
      <id>spring-milestones</id>
      <name>Spring Milestones</name>
      <url>https://repo.spring.io/milestone</url>
      <snapshots>
        <enabled>false</enabled>
      </snapshots>
    </repository>
  </repositories>

  <pluginRepositories>
    <pluginRepository>
      <id>spring-snapshots</id>
      <name>Spring Snapshots</name>
      <url>https://repo.spring.io/snapshot</url>
      <snapshots>
        <enabled>true</enabled>
      </snapshots>
    </pluginRepository>
    <pluginRepository>
      <id>spring-milestones</id>
      <name>Spring Milestones</name>
      <url>https://repo.spring.io/milestone</url>
      <snapshots>
        <enabled>false</enabled>
      </snapshots>
    </pluginRepository>
  </pluginRepositories>


</project>

/src/main/java/com/in28minutes/springboot/rest/example/SpringBoot2RestServiceApplication.java

package com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;

@SpringBootApplication
public class SpringBoot2RestServiceApplication {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    SpringApplication.run(SpringBoot2RestServiceApplication.class, args);
  }
}

/src/main/java/com/in28minutes/springboot/rest/example/student/Student.java

package com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example.student;

import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.Id;

@Entity
public class Student {
  @Id
  @GeneratedValue
  private Long id;
  private String name;
  private String passportNumber;
  
  public Student() {
    super();
  }

  public Student(Long id, String name, String passportNumber) {
    super();
    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
    this.passportNumber = passportNumber;
  }
  public Long getId() {
    return id;
  }
  public void setId(Long id) {
    this.id = id;
  }
  public String getName() {
    return name;
  }
  public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
  }
  public String getPassportNumber() {
    return passportNumber;
  }
  public void setPassportNumber(String passportNumber) {
    this.passportNumber = passportNumber;
  }
    
}

/src/main/java/com/in28minutes/springboot/rest/example/student/StudentNotFoundException.java

package com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example.student;

public class StudentNotFoundException extends RuntimeException {

  public StudentNotFoundException(String exception) {
    super(exception);
  }

}

/src/main/java/com/in28minutes/springboot/rest/example/student/StudentRepository.java

package com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example.student;

import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Repository;

@Repository
public interface StudentRepository extends JpaRepository<Student, Long>{

}

/src/main/java/com/in28minutes/springboot/rest/example/student/StudentResource.java

package com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example.student;

import java.net.URI;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Optional;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.DeleteMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PathVariable;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PostMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.PutMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestBody;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.support.ServletUriComponentsBuilder;

@RestController
public class StudentResource {

  @Autowired
  private StudentRepository studentRepository;

  @GetMapping("/students")
  public List<Student> retrieveAllStudents() {
    return studentRepository.findAll();
  }

  @GetMapping("/students/{id}")
  public Student retrieveStudent(@PathVariable long id) {
    Optional<Student> student = studentRepository.findById(id);

    if (!student.isPresent())
      throw new StudentNotFoundException("id-" + id);

    return student.get();
  }

  @DeleteMapping("/students/{id}")
  public void deleteStudent(@PathVariable long id) {
    studentRepository.deleteById(id);
  }

  @PostMapping("/students")
  public ResponseEntity<Object> createStudent(@RequestBody Student student) {
    Student savedStudent = studentRepository.save(student);

    URI location = ServletUriComponentsBuilder.fromCurrentRequest().path("/{id}")
        .buildAndExpand(savedStudent.getId()).toUri();

    return ResponseEntity.created(location).build();

  }
  
  @PutMapping("/students/{id}")
  public ResponseEntity<Object> updateStudent(@RequestBody Student student, @PathVariable long id) {

    Optional<Student> studentOptional = studentRepository.findById(id);

    if (!studentOptional.isPresent())
      return ResponseEntity.notFound().build();

    student.setId(id);
    
    studentRepository.save(student);

    return ResponseEntity.noContent().build();
  }
}

/src/main/resources/application.properties


/src/main/resources/data.sql

insert into student
values(10001,'Ranga', 'E1234567');

insert into student
values(10002,'Ravi', 'A1234568');

/src/test/java/com/in28minutes/springboot/rest/example/SpringBoot2RestServiceApplicationTests.java

package com.in28minutes.springboot.rest.example;

import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.springframework.boot.test.context.SpringBootTest;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringRunner;

@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
@SpringBootTest
public class SpringBoot2RestServiceApplicationTests {

  @Test
  public void contextLoads() {
  }

}

Related Posts

Spring Boot Tutorials for Beginners

At in28Minutes, we are creating a number of tutorials with videos, articles & courses on Spring Boot for Beginners and Experienced Developers. This resources will help you learn and gain expertise at Spring Boot.

Spring and Spring Boot Video Tutorials for Beginners

At in28Minutes, we are creating a number of tutorials with videos, articles & courses on Spring Boot for Beginners and Experienced Developers. Here's a list of video tutorials and courses for you

What is an In Memory Database?

In this article, we understand what the term "In-Memory Database" actually means. We see what scenarios they can be used, and why they are important.

What is an Embedded Server?

In this article, we focus in exploring what an embedded server is, and how they help make application deployment simpler.

Java Tools and Frameworks - Introduction To Maven

In this article, we experience a brief introduction to Maven, and will see how it helps in managing your project dependencies.

Five Tools To Learn as a Java Developer

In this article, we introduce you to five great tools that we recommend every Java Developer to learn.

Five Languages To Learn as a Java Programmer

As a programmer, you want to explore new things. Learning a new language gives you a different perspective when solving problems. What are the 5 languages that a Java developer should explore?

Five Great Frameworks To Try for Java Programmers

As a programmer you want to explore new languages and frameworks. What would be the best frameworks to explore in 2019 for Java Programmers?

Unit Testing Best Practices - with Java and Junit Examples

Unit Testing is often underrated. As far as I am concerned, having good unit tests seperates good projects from bad. In this article, let's look at unit testing best practices in depth. We use examples from Java and JUnit to illustrate the concepts. However, the best practices are applicable irrespective of the programming language used.

Programming Basics - Unit Testing - What Is Mocking?

Mocking is an important concept that is made use of, when writing unit tests. In this article, we explore what mocking is all about, and explore some of the popular Java mocking frameworks in use.